INTERVIEW: RAYE ZARAGOZA BREAKS GENDER BARRIERS WITH SINGLE “FIGHT LIKE A GIRL”

April 16, 2020
In The News

Singer-songwriter Raye Zaragoza is an award-winning artist championing impactful causes. She’s famously known for her song “In The River” which was written in response to the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline. The poignant track reached half a million video views and garnered national media coverage.
It not only made a name for Zaragoza but also pushed this important issue to the forefront. Now she is shedding light on a topic that’s been examined throughout history, but still prevalent in society today. “Fight Like A Girl” is a profound look at equality for women and what defines feminism. Her kindness and compassion for women of all backgrounds radiate throughout the track, creating an anthem of inclusivity. From her stunning folk voice to her colorful instrumentation, the song soars with determined grace.

Being from a multi-cultural background, Zaragoza has faced some adversity in life. It is because of this, she strongly voices her beliefs and is an advocate for change. Battling for justice and equality, Zaragoza is a true warrior and even has a song title as such. It’s that inspiring track to other impassioned releases such as “American Dream” that have gained her a large group of loyal fans who appreciate her direct and empowering messages. 

Atwood Magazine interviewed Raye Zaragoza, discussing her inspiring new single, social activism, and how she connects in an uncertain world!
ATWOOD MAGAZINE: YOUR NEW SINGLE “FIGHT LIKE A GIRL” IS AN INSPIRING ANTHEM OF STRENGTH FOR EVERY IDENTIFYING FEMALE OUT THERE. WHAT MOTIVATED YOU TO CREATE SUCH AN EMPOWERING TRACK OF RESILIENCE?
Raye Zaragoza: I wrote this song because I wanted to write an anthem with marginalized women at the center. The voices of women of color have not historically been at the forefront of feminism, and I think 2020 is an important time to change that. I wrote this song around the time that I met Deb Haaland, one of the two first Native American women in congress.

It’s women like her that remind me that women are capable of anything. I also interviewed a bunch of young girls recently about what it means to them to “fight like a girl.” Pretty much all of them had something positive to say. I’m excited to reclaim the term “fight like a girl” as a good thing rather than what it meant on the playground when I was a kid.